Corticosteroid mechanism in asthma

Glucocorticoids are potent anti-inflammatories, regardless of the inflammation's cause; their primary anti-inflammatory mechanism is lipocortin-1 (annexin-1) synthesis. Lipocortin-1 both suppresses phospholipase A2 , thereby blocking eicosanoid production, and inhibits various leukocyte inflammatory events ( epithelial adhesion , emigration , chemotaxis , phagocytosis , respiratory burst , etc.). In other words, glucocorticoids not only suppress immune response, but also inhibit the two main products of inflammation, prostaglandins and leukotrienes . They inhibit prostaglandin synthesis at the level of phospholipase A2 as well as at the level of cyclooxygenase /PGE isomerase (COX-1 and COX-2), [29] the latter effect being much like that of NSAIDs , potentiating the anti-inflammatory effect.

QNASL Nasal Aerosol is a pressurized, nonaqueous solution in a metered-dose aerosol device intended ONLY for intranasal use. It contains a solution of beclomethasone dipropionate in propellant HFA-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) and dehydrated ethanol. QNASL 40 mcg Nasal Aerosol delivers 40 mcg of beclomethasone dipropionate from the nasal actuator and 50 mcg from the valve. QNASL 80 mcg Nasal Aerosol delivers 80 mcg of beclomethasone dipropionate from the nasal actuator and 100 mcg from the valve. Each strength delivers 59 mg of solution from the valve with each actuation. Each canister of QNASL 40 mcg or 80 mcg Nasal Aerosol, contains  g of drug and excipients and each provides 120 actuations after priming. Additionally, QNASL 40 mcg Nasal Aerosol contains g of drug and excipients and provides 60 actuations after priming.

It would be difficult for physicians or allergists to imagine doing without corticosteroids in managing difficult cases of bronchial asthma. It is beyond any doubt that CS act on many sites to help reverse the pathologic process of bronchial asthma. Corticosteroids enhance the beta-adrenergic response to relieve the muscle spasm. They also act by reversing the mucosal edema, decreasing vascular permeability by vasoconstriction, and inhibiting the release of LTC4 and LTD4. Corticosteroids reduce the mucus secretion by inhibiting the release of secretagogue from macrophages. Corticosteroids inhibit the late phase reaction by inhibiting the inflammatory response and interfering with chemotaxis. This action may be due to the inhibition of LTB4 release. The eosinopenic effect of corticosteroids may help to prevent the cytotoxic effect of the major basic protein and other inflammatory mediators released from eosinophils. Corticosteroids have no effect on the immediate hypersensitivity reaction and have no direct role in bronchial reactivity. By blocking the late reaction, they prevent the increased airway reactivity observed with late bronchial reactions. The limitation of using corticosteroids are their side effects. They vary from tolerable to life threatening side effects. Each tissue in the body is a target for corticosteroids. The mechanism of adverse effects have been studied in extensive detail but many questions are yet to be answered. Alternate-day therapy and inhalation therapy are meant to minimize these side effects. The expansion of using inhaled steroid therapy and finding some inhaled preparations that have even less systemic side effects seems a reasonable approach to deal with severe asthma.

Corticosteroid mechanism in asthma

corticosteroid mechanism in asthma

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